Le Moyne College Summer Scholar Course Schedule: Summer Session I 2022
(June 1 - July 7)

COURSE #

COURSE NAME

DAYS

TIME

FORMAT

ASL-330AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IMW6:00PM-10:15PMON CAMPUS
BIO-191GENERAL BIOLOGY IMTWTH8:30AM-10:30AMON CAMPUS
BIO-191LGENERAL BIOLOGY I LABTTH11:30AM-2:30PMON CAMPUS
BSC-201HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I MTWTH5:00PM-8:00PMON CAMPUS
CHM-151CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES IMTWTH8:30AM-10:30AMONLINE VIA ZOOM
CHM-151LCHEMICAL PRINCIPLES I LABTTH11:00AM-2:00PMON CAMPUS
CHM-223*ORGANIC CHEMISTRY IMTWTH9:30AM-11:30AMON CAMPUS
CHM-223L*ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABMW1:00PM-4:30PMON CAMPUS
CRW-385/ENG-385*CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOPTTH12:00PM-4:00PMON CAMPUS
ECO-113PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICSMTW6:00PM-8:45PMON CAMPUS
ENG-210*MAJOR AUTHORS: CHUCK PALAHNIUKTTH6:00PM-10:00PMON CAMPUS
HST-111WORLD CIVILIZATION IIMTWTH10:45AM-12:45PMON CAMPUS
ITL-101ELEMENTARY ITALIAN IN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
ITL-201*INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN IN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
ITL-301*INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION IN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
MTH-111INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS (WITH COMPUTER LAB)MTWTH1:00PM-3:30PMON CAMPUS
MTH-145*CALCULUS IMTWTH10:45AM-1:15PMON CAMPUS
PHL-110INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHYW8:30AM-11:00AMONLINE VIA ZOOM
PHL-210MORAL PHILOSOPHYW1:30PM-4:00PMONLINE VIA ZOOM
PHS-120ASTRONOMYMTWTH8:30AM-10:30AMON CAMPUS
PHY-101NON-CALCULUS GENERAL PHYSICS IMTWTH3:45PM-5:45PMON CAMPUS
PHY-103GENERAL PHYSICS LABTTH6:00PM-8:00PMON CAMPUS
PSY-220*HUMAN LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENTN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
THE-202A RABBI MEETS JESUSN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS

*prerequisite required

Course Descriptions

ASL AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

ASL-330 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I
This course is designed for those with no previous knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL). It will introduce learners to the basics of grammatically correct ASL and communication techniques used within the Deaf community. Conversational skills will focus on asking and answering questions, exchanging personal information and talking about everyday activities. This course will present an overview of the various customs, norms, and traditions within Deaf culture. This course may not satisfy foreign language requirements at Le Moyne College. However, this course can be applied toward the language requirements for New York State teacher certification.

BIO BIOLOGY

BIO-191 GENERAL BIOLOGY I
This course introduces fundamental unifying principles of biology. Topics include the scientific method, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, membranes, energetics, cellular regulation and control, genetics, cell division and evolution. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO-191L GENERAL BIOLOGY I LAB

BSC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BSC-201 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I
This course is the first in a two-semester sequence providing a study of anatomy and physiology in the human body. Initial portions of the course will include terminology, cell biology, biological chemistry, and tissues. Body systems covered include the skeletal, muscle, nervous, and integumentary. The cat is the primary dissection specimen in the laboratory. Dissection required. Pre-requisites: none. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Does not carry biology major credit.

CHM CHEMISTRY

CHM-151 CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES I
An integrated approach to many of the major concepts of chemistry with approximately equal emphasis on general descriptive chemistry and introduction to theoretical chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular theory, periodic properties, chemical equations and stoichiometry. CHM 151 and CHM 151L are to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the chemistry placement exam or a grade of C or better in CHM 101 or permission of the department chair.

CHM-151L CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES I LAB
This laboratory includes experiments in chemical synthesis, analysis, and composition and physical properties. A variety of techniques are utilized. This laboratory course addresses many of the same topics CHM 151 treats in the classroom. CHM 151 and CHM 151L are to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair.

CHM-223 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
The nomenclature, structure, reactions, preparations and physical properties of organic compounds are studied. Extensive use of reaction mechanisms, resonance theory and conformational analysis is used to correlate a wide variety of reactions. Topics include chemical bonding, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, stereochemistry, spectroscopy and other functional groups. Special emphasis is on natural products and substances of biological importance. Prerequisites: CHM 152 or equivalent. CHM 223L is to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair.

CHM-223L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 LAB
This course will introduce fundamental organic chemistry laboratory techniques utilizing primarily microscale chemical reactions. Various skills will be developed, such as synthetic methods, purification methods (distillation, extraction, recrystallization, chromatography) and analytical techniques. The concepts of organic chemistry will be put into practice via the synthesis and study of materials of common use and theoretical interest. Prerequisites: CHM 152 or equivalent. CHM 223 is to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair.

CRW CREATIVE WRITING

CRW-385 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP
Intensive practice in the writing and criticism of poetry and fiction. Associated readings geared to the needs of the individual participant. Course can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ECO ECONOMICS

ECO-113 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
This course introduces economic analysis of household, business, and government choices in societies limited by scarce resources. Rational choice provides the foundation for understanding economic incentives facing consumers and producers. Supply and demand models illustrate the role of prices in determining resource allocation. Topics include economic efficiency, productivity, opportunity cost, marginal analysis, profit maximization, and international trade. In addition, the course introduces theories of economic performance under alternative market structures (e.g. competition vs. monopoly), market failure, and the role of the government in the economy. No prerequisites.

ENG ENGLISH

ENG-210 MAJOR AUTHORS
These courses provide students with an intensive study of the work of a major author such as Borges, Dante, Dickens, Homer, Morrison, Ovid, Rushdie, Shakespeare, Twain or Woolf, as well as the cultural and historical context from which the work emerges. Students will be expected to develop a critical vocabulary for analyzing these texts and to demonstrate their understanding of the material through class discussions, presentations and critical writing. Writing instructional. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

HST HISTORY

HST-111 WORLD CIVILIZATION II
This course surveys the most important developments, issues, accomplishments and problems of World civilizations since the eighteenth century and examines the development of African, Asian, European, Islamic, Native American and Latin American civilizations since the eighteenth century. A research paper is required of all students.

ITL ITALIAN

ITL-101 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I
This course is designed for those students who are beginning the study of Italian. This course includes the essentials of grammar, vocabulary building and composition, together with the reading of easy selections in prose and verse. Classroom audio-lingual practice can be supplemented by audio-taped material in Media Services, located in the library.

ITL-201 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I
After a rapid review of the essentials of grammar, students are introduced to an appreciation of the various forms of literary expression in prose and verse. Classroom audio-lingual practice can be supplemented by audio-taped material in Media Services, located in the library. Prerequisite: ITL 102 or two or three years of high-school Italian.

ITL-301 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION I
Emphasis on correct expression and vocabulary development. Audio-visual work, oral reports, compositions and class discussions based on readings from newspapers, magazines and current writings of significant authors. Prerequisites: ITL 202, three or four years of high-school Italian or permission of the instructor.

MTH MATHEMATICS

MTH-111 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS I (WITH COMPUTER LAB)
A data oriented, applied introduction to statistics; includes a two hour per week computer lab. Topics include descriptive statistics, data distributions, random sampling, relationships, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Statistical software will be used throughout this course. Prerequisite:Three years of Regents-level mathematics. Students may not take both MTH 110 and MTH 111.

MTH-145 CALCULUS I
A study of differential and integral calculus of one variable and applications. Prerequisite: four units of high-school mathematics or permission of the department chair.

PHL PHILOSOPHY

PHL-110 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
As a writing instructional course, this course introduces students to the practice of philosophy and to some of the central questions, modes of inquiry, and forms of analysis and argumentation that distinguish philosophy from other ways of understanding ourselves and our world. Organized around the themes of "the human condition" and "the examined life", the course engages students in reflective dialogue about central concepts that define the human condition (e.g., knowledge and understanding, beauty and value, justice and community, transcendence and the divine, etc.). By linking rigorous analysis with engaged reflection on the concrete task of living an examined life, PHL 110 exemplifies the core value of Le Moyne's Jesuit educational mission of educating both the hearts and minds of our students. Prerequisite: WRT 101 or permission of the department chair.

PHL-210 MORAL PHILOSOPHY
This course investigates the philosophical foundations of normative ethics in an effort to clarify the status of moral values in human life. Drawing upon classical as well as contemporary texts in moral theory, the course will consider issues such as: What does it mean to be a moral being or a moral agent? Are moral values grounded in human nature, the natural order, the divine? What are the methods and possible limits of reasoning about moral values? Is moral philosophy (merely) descriptive of the practices and values of various groups or can it be prescriptive; can it, that is, tell us what we ought to do? How might we understand the historical development of moral theory and the diversity of systems of value? How might conflicts between these systems of thought be understood, assessed, and/or resolved? Sections capped at 30. Prerequisite: PHL 110 or HON 110 or permission of the department chair.

PHS PHYSICAL SCIENCE

PHS-120 ASTRONOMY
A survey of modern astronomy. Planets, stars, galaxies and the present scientific view of the universe and its origin are discussed. No prerequisites. Three lecture hours weekly.

PHY PHYSICS

PHY-101 NON-CALCULUS GENERAL PHYSICS I
An elementary course in physics with topics selected from mechanics of solids and fluids, kinetic theory, and heat. A thorough knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry is a prerequisite. Because of the integration between PHY 101 and PHY 103, PHY 103 must be taken concurrently.

PHY-103 GENERAL PHYSICS LAB
The activities of these laboratory courses are designed to give students taking PHY 101-102 and PHY 105-106 direct experience with the fundamental concepts that are the subjects of those courses, making these laboratory courses an integral part of PHY 101-102 and PHY 105-106. A thorough knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry is a prerequisite. PHY 103 is a prerequisite for PHY 104. One two-hour laboratory period each full week of classes each semester.

PSY PSYCHOLOGY

PSY-220 HUMAN LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT
This course is a general introduction to human development. The study of human development is a scientific analysis of patterns of change and growth across the entire lifespan from conception through very old age. The course will include the investigation of essential questions of human experience including, inherited factors, attach- ment to caregivers, mastery of the human body and the environment, meaningful social relationships, achievement, occupational choice, impact of societal expectations, the formulation of values and goals, the concept of generativity, and death and dying. The course will analyze human develop- ment from a biopsychosocial perspective looking closely at basic patterns of normal development. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Students may receive major psychology elective credit for PSY 220 only if not also receiving major psychology elective credit from PSY 215 or PSY 320.

THE THEOLOGY

THE-202 A RABBI MEETS JESUS: A JEWISH CHRISTIAN ENCOUNTER
In the context of contemporary Jewish-Christian encounter, it is important to identify and to evaluate critically theological concepts which each of these religions teach and believe, including the idea of God, Law, Kingdom, Covenant, messiah, Holiness, and Sabbath. These theological concepts will be central to this course and will be explored through the study of primary religious texts, doctrines, and theological arguments.

© 2016 Le Moyne College.

All Rights Reserved. | 1419 Salt Springs Road,

Syracuse, NY 13214

| 800.333.4733 | 315.445.4100

Non-Discrimination|Contact Us