Le Moyne College Summer Scholar Course Schedule: Summer Session II 2022
(July 11 - August 11)

COURSE #

COURSE NAME

DAYS

TIME

FORMAT

ANT-101/PGS-101INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGYTTH6:00PM-10:00PMON CAMPUS
ASL-331*AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IIMW6:00PM-10:00PMON CAMPUS
BIO-192*GENERAL BIOLOGY IIMTWTH8:30AM-10:30AMON CAMPUS
BIO-192L*GENERAL BIOLOGY II LABTTH11:30AM-3:30PMON CAMPUS
BSC-202*HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY IIMTWTH5:00PM-8:00PMON CAMPUS
CHM-152*CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES IIMTWTH8:30AM-10:30AMONLINE VIA ZOOM
CHM-152L*CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II LABTTH11:00AM-2:00PMON CAMPUS
CHM-224*ORGANIC CHEMISTRY IIMTWTH9:30AM-11:30AMON CAMPUS
CHM-224L*ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABMW1:00PM-4:30PMON CAMPUS
CJS-100/PSC-100CURRENT ISSUES IN AMERICAN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
CRW-387/ENG-387*SCRIPTWRITINGTTH12:00PM-4:00PMON CAMPUS
ECO-114PRINCPLES OF MACROECONOMICSMTW6:00PM-8:45PMON CAMPUS
HST-110WORLD CIVILIZATION IMTWTH9:00AM-11:45AMON CAMPUS
HST-111WORLD CIVILIZATION IIN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
ITL-101ELEMENTARY ITALIAN IN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
ITL-102*ELEMENTARY ITALAIN IIN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
ITL-202*INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN IIN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
ITL-302*INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATIONS & COMPOSITION IN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
LAW-200LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESSN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
MTH-110INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS I (NO COMPUTER LAB)MTWTHF8:30AM-10:30AMON CAMPUS
MTH-112*INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS IIMTWTHF10:45AM-12:45PMON CAMPUS
MUS-121/THR-121MUSIC THEATRE HISTORYN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS
PHL-110*INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHYMTWTH1:30PM-3:30PMONLINE VIA ZOOM
PHL-210MORAL PHILOSOPHYMTWTH10:45AM-12:45PMONLINE VIA ZOOM
PHY-102*NON-CALCULUS GENERAL PHYSICS IIMTWTH3:45PM-5:45PMON CAMPUS
PHY-104GENERAL PHYSICS LABTTH6:00PM-8:00PMON CAMPUS
PSY-101INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGYMW6:00PM-10:00PMON CAMPUS
PSY-302*PERSONALITYMW6:00PM-10:00PMON CAMPUS
THE-237CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICSN/AN/AONLINE/ASYNCHRONOUS

*prerequisite required

Course Descriptions

ANT ANTHROPOLOGY

ANT-101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY
This course introduces students to the basic concepts, theories and methodologies in anthropology by focusing on the classic four fields of the discipline: physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and cultural anthropology. This course focuses on the evolution of the human species and theories of early culture, the reconstruction of the past through archaeological analysis, the structure and usage of language as part of culture, and the description and analysis of societies and cultures utilizing comparative theories and methodologies in cultural anthropology. No prerequisite. Fulfills Core requirement(s): DIV.

ASL AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

ASL-331 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II
This course expands the principles mastered in ASL I. It provides a more complete understanding of the language as it is used in conversation with an emphasis on vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. It will introduce the use of discourse strategies in ASL including: classifiers, use of space, appropriate choice of register and clear transitions between ideas. ASL II teaches the learners to use cultural protocols, ASL grammar for giving direction, describing family, occupations and attributing qualities to others. This course may not satisfy the foreign language requirements at Le Moyne College. However, this course can be applied toward the language requirements for New York State teacher certification.

BIO BIOLOGY

BIO-192 GENERAL BIOLOGY II
This course, while continuing to stress fundamental unifying principles of biology, presents the mechanisms that allow all living organisms to meet the common requirements for life. Topics include classification/diversity; basic characteristics of all kingdoms of life; plant and animal development, form and physiology; ecology and population biology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Dissection required. Carries biology major credit. Prerequisite: BIO 191 or permission.

BIO-192L GENERAL BIOLOGY I LAB

BSC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BSC-202 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II
This course is the second in a two-semester sequence providing a study of anatomy and physiology in the human body. Topics covered include the special senses, and the endocrine, circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Dissection required. Pre-requisites: a grade of C or better in BSC 201. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Does not carry biology major credit.

CHM CHEMISTRY

CHM-152 CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II
An integrated approach to many of the major concepts of chemistry with approximately equal emphasis on general descriptive chemistry and introduction to theoretical chemistry. Topics include chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, gas laws, solutions, acids and bases. CHM 152 and CHM 152L are to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CHM 151 or by permission of the department chair.

CHM-152L CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II LAB
This laboratory includes experiments in chemical synthesis, analysis, separation, kinetics, and equilibrium. A variety of techniques and modern equipment are utilized. This laboratory course addresses many of the same topics CHM 152 treats in the classroom. CHM 152 and CHM 152L are to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair.

CHM-224 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
The nomenclature, structure, reactions, preparations and physical properties of organic compounds are studied. Extensive use of reaction mechanisms, resonance theory and conformational analysis is used to correlate a wide variety of reactions. Topics include aromatics, carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and other functional groups. Special emphasis is on natural products and substances of biological importance. Prerequisites: CHM 223. The course counts for three credit hours. CHM 224L is to be taken concurrently, except by permission of department chair.

CHM-224L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LAB
The course will build upon the foundation of organic chemistry laboratory techniques and concepts from the first semester, utilizing primarily microscale chemical reactions and techniques. Various skills will be learned and improved upon, such as purification methods (distillation, extraction, recrystallization, chromatography), synthetic methods, and analytical techniques. Functional groups studied will include alkenes, arenes, carbonyl compounds, etc. Prerequisites: CHM 223 and CHM 223L (or equivalents). The course counts for one credit hour. CHM 224 is to be taken concurrently except by permission of the department chair.

CJS CRIMINOLOGY

CJS-100 CURRENT ISSUES IN AMERICA
A study of several important issues in contemporary American society and of the manner in which they are being handled by our political system. Among the issues covered are: the energy crisis, nuclear energy, toxic wastes, inflation, recession, government spending, crime, military spending, the arms race and the new religious right. This course does not fulfill requirements for a major in political science; it will carry credit toward a minor.


CRW CREATIVE WRITING

CRW-387 SCRIPTWRITING
This course provides study and practice in the special requirements of writing fictional works for television and film. This course will focus on: basic dramatic structures and story telling, the premise, the pitch, character development, writing the treatment, story outlines, writing the master scene and completing the script. At semester end, students are expected to produce full-length tele-plays, radio dramas or film scripts. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ECO ECONOMICS

ECO-114 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
This course introduces the basic concepts of macroeconomics through which students develop a working knowledge of the U.S. economy. Students learn the relationship between fiscal and monetary policies and short-run business cycle fluctuations, and what factors produce long-run economic growth. This knowledge helps students to identify and explain current macroeconomic issues and outcomes such as the unemployment rate, inflation rate, interest rates, budget and trade deficits, national debt, and exchange rates. Students learn the roles that money, banking, and the financial sector play, and how government spending and taxes affect the economy. No prerequisites.

ENG ENGLISH

ENG-387 SCRIPTWRITING
This course provides study and practice in the special requirements of writing fictional works for television and film. This course will focus on: basic dramatic structures and story telling, the premise, the pitch, character development, writing the treatment, story outlines, writing the master scene and completing the script. At semester end, students are expected to produce full-length tele-plays, radio dramas or film scripts. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

HST HISTORY

HST-110 WORLD CIVILIZATION I
This course surveys the most important developments, issues, accomplishments and problems of World civilizations, provides an introduction to the study of African, Asian, European, Islamic, Native American, and Latin American civilizations, and discusses the relationships among these civilizations to the eighteenth century.

HST-111 WORLD CIVILIZATION II
This course surveys the most important developments, issues, accomplishments and problems of World civilizations since the eighteenth century and examines the development of African, Asian, European, Islamic, Native American and Latin American civilizations since the eighteenth century. A research paper is required of all students.

ITL ITALIAN

ITL-101 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I
This course is designed for those students who are beginning the study of Italian. This course includes the essentials of grammar, vocabulary building and composition, together with the reading of easy selections in prose and verse. Classroom audio-lingual practice can be supplemented by audio-taped material in Media Services, located in the library.

ITL-102 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II
This course is designed for those students who are beginning the study of Italian. This course includes the essentials of grammar, vocabulary building and composition, together with the reading of easy selections in prose and verse. Classroom audio-lingual practice can be supplemented by audio-taped material in Media Services, located in the library.

ITL-202 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II
After a rapid review of the essentials of grammar, students are introduced to an appreciation of the various forms of literary expression in prose and verse. Classroom audio-lingual practice can be supplemented by audio-taped material in Media Services, located in the library. Prerequisite: ITL 102 or two or three years of high-school Italian.

ITL-302 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION II
Emphasis on correct expression and vocabulary development. Audio-visual work, oral reports, compositions and class discussions based on readings from newspapers, magazines and current writings of significant authors. Prerequisites: ITL 202, three or four years of high-school Italian or permission of the instructor.

LAW LAW

LAW-200 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS
This course provides an introduction to the various ways in which laws and the legal system affect the conduct of business. Students will be encouraged to use their understanding of law and the legal system as a tool in ethical business decision making. Some reference to the impact of law in the international sphere will be included.

MTH MATHEMATICS

MTH-110 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS I (NO COMPUTER LAB)
A data-oriented, applied introduction to statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, data distributions, random sampling, relationships, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Statistical software will be used throughout this course. Prerequisite: Three years of regents- level mathematics. Students may not take both MTH 110 and MTH 111.

MTH-112 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS II
This course is a continuation of MTH 110 and MTH 111. Further methods of statistics and their use in life will be covered. It includes: inference for one and two population means, inference for two proportions and two variances, inference for simple and multiple regression, categorical data analysis, analysis of variance, nonparametric tests and logistic regression. A statistical program will be used throughout this course. Prerequisites: MTH 110, MTH 111 or equivalent.

MUS MUSIC

MUS-121 MUSICAL THEATRE HISTORY
Students will study the development of musical theatre, ranging from the dramas of ancient Greece to the megamusicals of today. Students will also study the theatrical review, utilizing this knowledge to critique filmed and live performances. Along the way, students will recognize the link between the development of the musical and societal trends and events. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Visual and Performing Arts (VPA).

PGS PEACE AND GLOBAL STUDIES

PGS-101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY
This course introduces students to the basic concepts, theories and methodologies in anthropology by focusing on the classic four fields of the discipline: physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and cultural anthropology. This course focuses on the evolution of the human species and theories of early culture, the reconstruction of the past through archaeological analysis, the structure and usage of language as part of culture, and the description and analysis of societies and cultures utilizing comparative theories and methodologies in cultural anthropology. No prerequisite. Fulfills Core requirement(s): DIV.

PHL PHILOSOPHY

PHL-110 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
As a writing instructional course, this course introduces students to the practice of philosophy and to some of the central questions, modes of inquiry, and forms of analysis and argumentation that distinguish philosophy from other ways of understanding ourselves and our world. Organized around the themes of "the human condition" and "the examined life", the course engages students in reflective dialogue about central concepts that define the human condition (e.g., knowledge and understanding, beauty and value, justice and community, transcendence and the divine, etc.). By linking rigorous analysis with engaged reflection on the concrete task of living an examined life, PHL 110 exemplifies the core value of Le Moyne's Jesuit educational mission of educating both the hearts and minds of our students. Prerequisite: WRT 101 or permission of the department chair.

PHL-210 MORAL PHILOSOPHY
This course investigates the philosophical foundations of normative ethics in an effort to clarify the status of moral values in human life. Drawing upon classical as well as contemporary texts in moral theory, the course will consider issues such as: What does it mean to be a moral being or a moral agent? Are moral values grounded in human nature, the natural order, the divine? What are the methods and possible limits of reasoning about moral values? Is moral philosophy (merely) descriptive of the practices and values of various groups or can it be prescriptive; can it, that is, tell us what we ought to do? How might we understand the historical development of moral theory and the diversity of systems of value? How might conflicts between these systems of thought be understood, assessed, and/or resolved? Sections capped at 30. Prerequisite: PHL 110 or HON 110 or permission of the department chair.

PHY PHYSICS

PHY-102 NON-CALCULUS GENERAL PHYSICS II
A continuation of PHY 101 with topics selected from waves, electromagnetic theory, and optics. General Physics I (either PHY 101 or PHY 105) and PHY 103 are prerequisites. Because of the integration between PHY 102 and PHY 104, PHY 104 must be taken concurrently.

PHY-104 GENERAL PHYSICS LAB
The activities of these laboratory courses are designed to give students taking PHY 101-102 and PHY 105-106 direct experience with the fundamental concepts that are the subjects of those courses, making these laboratory courses an integral part of PHY 101-102 and PHY 105-106. A thorough knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry is a prerequisite. PHY 103 is a prerequisite for PHY 104. One two-hour laboratory period each full week of classes each semester.

PSC POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSC-100 CURRENT ISSUES IN AMERICA
A study of several important issues in contemporary American society and of the manner in which they are being handled by our political system. Among the issues covered are: the energy crisis, nuclear energy, toxic wastes, inflation, recession, government spending, crime, military spending, the arms race and the new religious right. This course does not fulfill requirements for a major in political science; it will carry credit toward a minor.Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSY PSYCHOLOGY

PSY-101 INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY
A one semester broad overview of contemporary psychology-its diverse approaches to the understanding of behavior and the basic principles and research findings associated with each of these approaches. Specific areas of psychological inquiry discussed include physiological, cognitive and social psychology; learning, sensation and perception; emotion and motivation; personality and psychopathology. This course is a prerequisite for most psychology courses.

PSY-302 PERSONALITY
Introduction to the theoretical and empirical investigations of the development, maintenance and modification of the unique thoughts, emotions and behaviors characteristic of the individual. Topics include theoretical perspectives based primarily upon the concepts of conflict (e.g., Freud, Jung), fulfillment (e.g., Rogers, Maslow), consistency (e.g., Kelley), trait (e.g., Allport, Carrell) and learning (e.g., Skinner, Bandura) and empirical investigations of self-esteem, anxiety and defense mechanisms. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

THE THEOLOGY

THE-237 CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS
This course offers an approach to contemporary social issues and underscores the importance of the Christian ethical dimension in these issues and in character formation. Students will be introduced to the methods and resources for ethical analysis and decision making. Issues addressed will include the family, liberation, violence, non-violence, the environment, sexuality, the economy, life and death and medicine.

THR THEATRE ARTS

THR-121 MUSICAL THEATRE HISTORY
Students will study the development of musical theatre, ranging from the dramas of ancient Greece to the megamusicals of today. Students will also study the theatrical review, utilizing this knowledge to critique filmed and live performances. Along the way, students will recognize the link between the development of the musical and societal trends and events.

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